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Below par

Postby David Regal » Tue Jan 16, 2007 10:07 pm

Can someone tell me why a below par or sub par performance indicates it's bad, whereas for golf it's the opposite? For a golfer being below par is an above par performance lol. I'm guessing the words weren't originally used in reference to golf.
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Postby TheConfessor » Tue Jan 16, 2007 10:55 pm

Good question. And why is it considered a pejorative to call someone a "bonehead?" Aren't heads supposed to have bones? Would it be a compliment to call someone a "boneless head?"

And what's all this I'm hearing about brainy yaks? Are they really that much smarter than American cattle?
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Postby Isaac Cashman » Wed Jan 17, 2007 11:25 am

The Stock Market and financial markets in general.

The most obvious example: There are lots of bonds which are due in 2020. There will be a par (average) value for such bonds. A specific Bond will sell below par if it has a lower interst rate than comparable bonds or if it is more likely to go into default than other such bonds.
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Postby krf100 » Wed Jan 17, 2007 11:55 am

There's a whole plethora of things I've never understood. Why is fat chance a synonym for slim chance? Why do you park on a driveway and drive on a parkway? Why is it a shipment if it goes by car and cargo if it goes by ship?
I forgot what I was going to say...
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Postby WhitePhantom » Wed Jan 17, 2007 2:52 pm

Shouldn't a "near-miss" be called "a near-hit"? After all, it's an actual miss.
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Postby velocity boy » Wed Jan 17, 2007 4:40 pm

WhitePhantom wrote:Shouldn't a "near-miss" be called "a near-hit"? After all, it's an actual miss.


You partially answered your own question. A near miss is indeed a miss. The word near is an adjective describing the kind of miss it is. "A near hit" doesn't make sense at all. A hit is a hit. A shot can't land near the target and also hit the target at the same time. It must be one or the other. If you "nearly hit" your target then you could call that a near miss but in this case nearly is an adverb describing the verb hit. To sum up, to "nearly hit" can also be described as a "near miss". A "near hit" doesn't even exist, ever.
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Postby WhitePhantom » Thu Jan 18, 2007 5:05 pm

velocity boy wrote:You partially answered your own question. A near miss is indeed a miss. The word near is an adjective describing the kind of miss it is. "A near hit" doesn't make sense at all. A hit is a hit. A shot can't land near the target and also hit the target at the same time. It must be one or the other. If you "nearly hit" your target then you could call that a near miss but in this case nearly is an adverb describing the verb hit. To sum up, to "nearly hit" can also be described as a "near miss". A "near hit" doesn't even exist, ever.

But if I describe something, as, say, a "near catastrophe", that means it wasn't a catastrophe, just close to one.
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Postby soxfan99 » Thu Jan 18, 2007 11:24 pm

WhitePhantom wrote:Shouldn't a "near-miss" be called "a near-hit"? After all, it's an actual miss.


"A near miss? It's a near hit. A collision is a near miss. BOOM!! Look, they nearly missed. Yes, but not quite!!" - Carlin, in my favorite standup bit of all time
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Postby velocity boy » Fri Jan 19, 2007 10:31 am

WhitePhantom wrote:
velocity boy wrote:You partially answered your own question. A near miss is indeed a miss. The word near is an adjective describing the kind of miss it is. "A near hit" doesn't make sense at all. A hit is a hit. A shot can't land near the target and also hit the target at the same time. It must be one or the other. If you "nearly hit" your target then you could call that a near miss but in this case nearly is an adverb describing the verb hit. To sum up, to "nearly hit" can also be described as a "near miss". A "near hit" doesn't even exist, ever.

But if I describe something, as, say, a "near catastrophe", that means it wasn't a catastrophe, just close to one.



A near miss means you barely missed, not almost missed.

Substituting catastrophe for miss doesn’t change anything so saying that an event was a near catastrophe when you mean it was nearly a catastrophe doesn’t make any more sense than saying something was a near hit when you mean that something was nearly hit.
Adjectives can only describe the noun they are assigned to, they cannot eliminate entirely they basic meaning of the word. A _____ catastrophe has to be first and foremost a catastrophe of some kind.
If you want to say an event was almost a catastrophe but wasn’t quite a catastrophe you have to modify the verb.
“That was nearly a catastrophe.” In this case nearly is describing the verb was not the noun catastrophe.

I feel bad that I am explaining my point badly but I hope you can understand what I am trying to say.
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Postby Momma Snider » Fri Jan 19, 2007 10:48 am

Was the original question, about par and golf, just a rhetorical question, or a real one? Because if it was real, the answer is that in golf, a lower score is better, so if you're below par, you're better than average.

But I like most of the funny ones, too.
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Postby cadams35 » Sat Jan 20, 2007 5:19 pm

krf100 wrote:There's a whole plethora of things I've never understood. Why is fat chance a synonym for slim chance? Why do you park on a driveway and drive on a parkway? Why is it a shipment if it goes by car and cargo if it goes by ship?


And why are a wise man and a wise guy opposites?

Quote:

A wise man speaks because he has something to say. A wise guy speaks because he has to say something.
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Re: Below par

Postby cadams35 » Sat Jan 20, 2007 5:31 pm

David Regal wrote:Can someone tell me why a below par or sub par performance indicates it's bad, whereas for golf it's the opposite? For a golfer being below par is an above par performance lol. I'm guessing the words weren't originally used in reference to golf.


I get confused too. The only good thing about it is this:

My scores are always way above par. Therefore, I way above par. Hence, I am an excellent player, much better than Tiger, who is way below par and does very poorly (in this sense).
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